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Why You Should Ditch Windows 7 – ASAP

Posted by Kris Fair on Sep 26, 2018 6:04:42 PM

It’s time for a good old conversation about operating systems. Rarely do we form such an emotional bond with any software as we do with our favorite OS. It makes sense, of course. It manages everything you do. It is either is your best friend making life seamless and easy, or a consistent fiend irritating you every time you try to find or do something.  

I remember when Windows 8 came out. It was revolutionary – and controversial. Microsoft had pushed the envelope by removing the beloved “start” button and radically changing the overall look. From the public resistance it seemed as if they had tampered with a dear childhood memory. It was as if Sesame Street had announced that Cookie Monster would only live on carrots from now on. People openly called for boycotting Windows 8 and when new PC orders came in, customers expressly requested Windows 7. Microsoft listened, sped up the publication of Windows 10, and fixed most of the issues by striking a balance between their innovation and people’s comfort zone. Most notably, they brought back the start button, of course. Yet in the meantime, something interesting happened. Windows 7 established itself as the symbol of the “Anti-8-Movement." I still have people very wary of Windows 10 when ordering a new PC because they disliked Windows 8. You can still find machines pre-loaded with downgrade rights to Windows 7, although the official sale for pre-installed Windows 7 machines ended two years ago!

As great as Windows 7 was, it is finally time to let go! We all need to move on.

So, if you are currently looking to buy a new PC, do NOT buy one with a Windows 7 operating system.

Windows extended support ends January 14, 2020, so in about 14 months your PC will no longer receive any updates or patches and leave a huge security risk. The traditional lifecycle of a PC is around 3 years. If you buy a new Windows 7 PC now, it will be obsolete at half of its usual life cycle.

For larger organizations, it is imperative to actively start replacing Windows 7 machines, especially if you’re looking to phase in the transition over multiple budget cycles.    

If you are working with a customer software that runs on Windows 7, now is the time to speak to your manufacturer or vendor and request a date of when you can move to Windows 10.

Finally, it is not just the fact that Microsoft is no longer giving you a choice. As a long-time Windows 10 user, I can vouch that I genuinely love the operating system. The convergence between an app-driven OS and your traditional file and folder structure works really well and leaves it up to the users to set their own preferences and change  as much or as little as you like. I personally love using the tiles for quick access, especially when used with a touch device. And if you can’t remember where you left a file, Cortana can actually be pretty handy. If you’re still not convinced, check out our blog that describes 3 features in Windows 10.

Topics: Windows Operating System, Upgrades